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COVID 19 In San Diego.

Last Friday was nor just another regular day; it was a day marked with the title of the highest number of new COVID-19 cases reported over one day in San Diego County, amounting to 634. After the numbers have relatively dialed down perhaps the anxiety and nervousness have eased. However, such a sensation is proving to be a false sense of security because of the past easement of restrictions. Additionally, this number came out of a total test of only 9,224 tests administered on that day despite the population numbers in San Diego being a lot higher. This begs to wonder what the actuality of the numbers associated with the virus really is lurking in the sunny San Diego.

Luckily, the medical resources in this town are abundant. With numerous hospitals and facilities. Scripps La Jolla, UCSD Health-Jacobs Medical Center, Sharp Memorial Hospital are just a few of the highly respected places available to treat patients facing the beastly virus. This is almost like a safety blanket that covers the locals which are perhaps why reaching the number of new cases above 600 for the first time did not strike an intense panic. 

After a relatively stable growth rate for several months, the region's COVID-19 case totals are increasing at a faster rate than previously seen. Breaking down the percentages, Of the total positive cases, 2,154 — or 9.6% — have been hospitalized and 562 — or 2.5% — of cases have been admitted to an intensive care unit. It seems like in relative terms the city of San Diego has everything under control without grave threats to put an intense strain on the resources for healthcare. Though the reality is that there is some cause for concern despite an abundance of support since the country deals with shortages of tests and rising hospitalizations and deaths. The lockdown measures are necessary to the aim of slowing down the virus in the hope of preventing hospitals from being overrun. To keep tabs on capacity, officials watch out for rapid increases in the number of confirmed COVID-19 patients. 

In order to proactively approach this virus and the increasing number of COVID-19 cases, the County is hiring additional people to do case investigations, an important activity in public health responses to infectious disease. Case investigators call or email people who have tested positive for COVID-19 to ask them to isolate themselves and find out their close contacts. This is done in order to identify danger zones and trace the outbreaks in order to minimize further contacts amongst individuals. State and local officials are closely watching the latest figures as they weigh when and how to reopen after closing down once again. One metric is whether counties have kept the number of new cases reported over the last 14 days to less than 100 per 100,000 residents. Sadly, San Diego County currently fails that test. Over the last two weeks, officials have confirmed 6,793 new cases, which amounts to 206 per 100,000.

How is the virus spreading?

A question that perhaps over people is where do contract COVID-19. Two new community setting outbreaks were also reported, both traced to restaurants, the county says. In the past week, there have been 13 community outbreaks — nearly double the county's trigger of seven outbreaks in seven days. What this means is that the intermixing between community members and interactions that cause people to contract the virus. To dissect the demographics further, it is essential to note that of the nearly 21,500 COVID-19 cases reported in the region, San Diegans between 20 and 39 years of age represent nearly 44% of all cases.
A closer look at the HHSA data shows that after restaurants, bars, wineries, breweries, hotels, and other businesses reopened, the number of people between 20 and 39 years of age getting sick with COVID-19 began to rise rapidly.

What this means for the future prospects of San Diego have implications on the community interactions come fall. The new numbers come as California announces that counties that are on the state's watch list for 14 consecutive days will not be allowed to reopen for in-person school in the fall. San Diego County was placed on the monitoring list on July 3 which means that there is a very high chance that kids will not be returning back to regular schooling in the light of these recent data and statistics published in the San Diego county. There are development plans for rigorous instruction for students even when schools are physically closed. However, all final decisions to open in-person will be determined by local data that the public can track on a daily basis. Schools open for in-person instruction will implement precautions, including a requirement that students in 3rd grade and above wear masks. It seems unlikely the vast majority of districts will have classroom instruction in the fall as the coronavirus pandemic surges, and even so the rules include a mandate that students above 2nd grade and all staff wear masks in school.

Regulations In San Diego.

Amongst the San Diego community, most businesses and stores have implemented safety precautions such as wearing masks, social distancing, and closing non-essential locations such as hair salons, nails salons, some stores, and museums after already returning to reopenings for a brief period of time. Perhaps these actions could signify to something resembling the long-dreaded second wave. Cloth face coverings or masks are implemented in order to help reduce the spread of coronavirus, especially when combined with physical distancing and frequent hand washing. Starting June 18, Californians must wear face coverings in common and public indoor spaces and outdoors when distancing is not possible. 

Necessary public health measures to prevent the spread of the virus have halted tourism, shuttered restaurants and bars, forced many to work from home, severely limited most businesses from interacting with their customers, and caused unemployment and uncertainty for tens of thousands in the San Diego region. With businesses that are particularly struggling, in order to ensure the resiliency of local businesses and assist in job retention, the City of San Diego has established a Small Business Relief Fund (SBRF) to provide grants and forgivable or low- to zero-interest-rate loans to eligible small businesses for working capital.

What this means for the future prospects of San Diego have implications on the community interactions come fall. The new numbers come as California announces that counties that are on the state's watch list for 14 consecutive days will not be allowed to reopen for in-person school in the fall. San Diego County was placed on the monitoring list on July 3 which means that there is a very high chance that kids will not be returning back to regular schooling in light of these recent data and statistics published in the San Diego county. There are development plans for a rigorous instruction for students even when schools are physically closed. However, all final decisions to open in-person will be determined by local data that the public can track on a daily basis. Schools open for in-person instruction will implement precautions, including a requirement that students in 3rd grade and above wear masks.

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